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Ethiopias

Ethiopias

(09/20/12)
With 4 offering from Ethiopia currently on the list, I thought it would be fun to cup them all together and share them with a few others to see what they thought about them all together and on their own. With two coffees from Shakiso, one from Sidama, and one from Kochere (which is also Dry Processed), we have a fairly diverse selection to look at. It was a lot of fun to watch some folks cup these coffees from warm to cool, and to see the differences begin to show up in the cup. Obviously the first detectable difference was between the washed and dry processed coffees. But as the cups cooled, more and more nuance began to grow between even the washed cups, and even between the cups from the different Shakiso coffees. One thing that I thought was really interesting in the public cupping that i did was that the people who preferred either Shakiso picked each as either their first or second favorite, while the people who preferred the Sidama definitely responded to a quality in that coffee that was quite distinct from the Shakiso coffees. The Kochere was so unique that is was really looked at as something else entirely.

Let's begin with the coffees from Shakiso.

Ethiopia Organic Shakiso Mora Mora & Ethiopia Organic Guji Shakiso

http://coffeeshrub.com/shrub/coffee/ethiopia-organic-shakiso-mora-mora

http://coffeeshrub.com/shrub/coffee/ethiopia-organic-shakiso-mora-mora

One thing that really stood out about these coffee was a similarity that they shared, which was that they both had a great body, like fresh apricot juice or even like a well made egg drop soup. More full that juicy, but not quite syrupy or creamy, and yet still very clean cups throughout. The Mora Mora showed a bit of a dry almond character, and generally had an almond like sweetness that complimented the melon fruited note as it cooled. There is still some floral element throughout, especially with the melon notes in the cool cup. The Guji Shakiso is different in that the acidity is a much more citric one, and there's not quite the nutty note in it either, rather a dry chamomile-like floral quality. As I noted before though, this coffee shares the same mouthfeel as the Mora Mora, and because of this I think that they would both add something really unique to a blend for espresso.

Ethiopia Sidama Deri Kochoha

http://coffeeshrub.com/shrub/coffee/ethiopia-sidama-deri-kochoha

This coffee, along with the Teklu Dembel from Yirga Cheffe that we had earlier this year, were some of the most floral coffees that I had ever had. This Deri Kochoha is a little drier up front, but opens up to potent jasmine notes thought a whole range of roasts. The tannins in the cup hint at spice and tea notes, and add a pleasing complexity to the honeyed graham cracker sweetness. Even at Full City, the floral elements were quite evident from the dry fragrance all the way through to the finish in the cool cup. This coffee spectacular in a number of brew methods as well, even auto-drip, you're not gonna lose the floral notes, and is a fairly complete espresso all on its own especially since you can take it a bit deeper into the roast. All of this, plus there's a brilliant citric acidity, which paired with the tannins in the cup give it a crisp and bright finish. I said it in a comment on the page for the coffee itself, but I feel confident that this is an "exotic" coffee that will appeal to a really wide audience.

Ethiopia Grade 1 Kochere Dry Process

http://www.coffeeshrub.com/shrub/coffee/ethiopia-grade-one-kochere-dry-p...

Fruits, earthy chocolate, rustic spice, and then fruits again. This is very refined version of the classic dry processes Ethiopian coffee. There is texture and earthiness in the cup, but just enough to keep the baked peaches, strawberries, melons, and figs in check. The fruits are the star of the cup, and jump out at before you ever grind it. What makes is more interesting though is the play between the honey and rustic spice in the finish. As the cup cools, the cup clears up as well with the fruits becoming a little more winey in character which pairs with the spice and cocoa in the best way. One of my favorite blends of all time is WP and DP Ethiopia blend at about a 75% WP to 25% DP, this gives you all the fruit still from the DP, but in a way that propels the floral notes in the WP. A blend like this with the Kochere and the Mora Mora turned out spectacularly in a clever brew. The jammy fruit and dry almond combined to give the brew a distinct tawny port character, which was super delicious. I also think that this coffee blended with the Java Pitaloka would produce a rather refined Mokka-Java style cup.