Latest Posts

  1. Podcast Episode #21 - Burundi Conversation with Alistair Sequeira - Part 1

    Podcast Episode #21 - Burundi Conversation with Alistair Sequeira - Part 1

    Part 1 of 2 - Talking about the coffee supply chain among other topics

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  2. Colombia: Early Harvest in Nariño

    Colombia: Early Harvest in Nariño

    Harvest in Nariño comes at a time that is somewhat in between the middle and main harvests of our other primary sources of Colombian coffee, namely Urrao and Caicedo in the north, and La Plata and Inzá down south.

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  3. Guatemala: Proyecto Xinabajul

    Guatemala: Proyecto Xinabajul

    For years we have thought about working in a more direct way with small-scale farmers in Guatemala, and in the 2013 harvest year this effort came to fruition.

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  4. Another Home Roaster Takes the Leap

    Another Home Roaster Takes the Leap

    Sweet Maria's customer jumps into his own coffee business

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  5. A Path to Food-Grade Cascara at the Helsar Micro-mill

    A Path to Food-Grade Cascara at the Helsar Micro-mill

    Cascara beverages are popping up everywhere these days.

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  6. Day after Day Job

    Day after Day Job

    Many home roasting enthusiasts dream of starting their own roasting businesses.

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  7. Fundamentals: Roasting Guatemalas and Washed Central American Coffees

    Fundamentals: Roasting Guatemalas and Washed Central American Coffees

    High grown washed Central American coffees are practically the control coffee when it comes to roasting, the coffees that roast just like they should.

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  8. Decaf Fundamentals - Updated 1/2017

    Decaf Fundamentals - Updated 1/2017

    When thinking about how to make an excellent decaffeinated coffee you have to first focus on the coffee before decaffeination.

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  9. Introducing the Quest M3s Drum Coffee Roaster

    Introducing the Quest M3s Drum Coffee Roaster

    The Quest M3s isn't necessarily bigger than our other home machines, but perhaps more closely resembles a production roasting experience.

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  10. Taste and Price: When Values Shift

    Taste and Price: When Values Shift

    I recently caught glimpse of this and found it very thought-provoking.

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  11. Day After Day Job Part 6

    Day After Day Job Part 6

    Part 6: Dream Machine- choosing a roaster.

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  12. Saying Hello to Huky

    Saying Hello to Huky

    Tom and Chris from www.hukyforum.com talk about the Huky 1lb roaster.

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Let's Take a Break and Have Some Coffee 

Let's Take a Break and Have Some Coffee 
(07/24/15)


Taking a look at our offer lists the last few days, I realize that a huge part of our job is keeping coffees separate. Sure, we excel in many other areas too (we are coffee "sourcerers" afterall!), but after taking into account that we currently have over 80 different lots of coffee for sale between Coffee Shrub and Sweet Maria's, I find myself greatly appreciating our warehouse crew's attention to detail, keeping each lot separate from the filling stage all the way to the picked and packaged orders.

Starting here as a warehouse worker myself, I know that even without tasting all of our coffees you get a sense of just how diverse coffee can be - from the array of 'green' smells released from a fresh bag of raw coffee, to the visual differences that come with varying processing methods and varietals. But when it comes to comparing coffees, there really is no substitute for tasting. And that's what we did this week - gather the whole Sweet Maria's team around a folding table to taste and talk about four very different coffees.
The Whole Gang is Here

The Whole Gang is Here

This wasn't about parsing out obscure flavor descriptors, or looking for minor differences in cleanliness and acidity. It was to illustrate that in some cases, the stark contrasts we see/sense in the green coffees we handle are just as easily tasted in the brewed coffee. You don't need a refined palate to taste the difference between Yemen and Sumatra, or dry and wet processed coffees from the same part of Ethiopia. And if you're anything like me, tasting different flavor profiles from one coffee to the next only reinforces the way I remember these coffees.

But perhaps most important, everyone had something to say about the flavors they tasted. You don't have to be a professional coffee taster to do this, and when putting exotic coffees such as these on the table, everyone invariably had a lot to say. So we took a break, tasted coffees together, and talked about the "how"s and "why"s of four very unique cup profiles.