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ROASTED: Ethiopia Yirga Cheffe Kore Kochore + Ethiopia Gr. 1 Dry Process Yirga Cheffe Kochore

ROASTED: Ethiopia Yirga Cheffe Kore Kochore + Ethiopia Gr. 1 Dry Process Yirga Cheffe Kochore

Sept. 17, 2014

Here comes two Yirga Cheffe Kochore coffees with two different processing methods. Both of these coffees come from the same washing station in Kochore Kebele ("Kebele" is a political district south of Yirga Cheffe town and is home to many small farms). I thought it would be a good taste comparison to roast a coffee from the same area/washing station with two different processing methods. Also, I approached these two coffees differently in the roaster according to their processing method.

 

Ethiopia Yirga Cheffe Kore Kochore City+

Juicy, juicy body from start to finish. Fresh fruit salad along with sparkling cane sugar and amazing aromatics. I brewed this coffee with the Bunn Trifecta (metal filter, no paper) at work, and at home using a Bee House dripper. I enjoyed them both ways, but found that the Bee House brew really blew my socks off...it is outstanding. I typically brew just a little on the heavy side to pronounce the body and intensity the coffee when I brew at home.

Ethiopia Gr 1. Dry Process Yirga Cheffee Kochore City+

A very round cup with both mouthfeel and cleanliness. You won't find the typical wildness and intense fruit notes that you may have been used to with other dry processed coffees. Up front there's a silky smooth body that rolls fruit flavors (juicy ripe red apple, red grapes and tropical fruits) in with every sip. I was able to maintain a nice acidity level that this coffee has to offer that hits nicely in the middle. The aftertaste leaves a raw almond-like flavor and mouthfeel. Delicious.

Recently there have been a few home roasters inquiring about how I approach dry processed coffees in the roaster. This is a great question and I will explain it a bit in this blog. There is not a definite answer to how a coffee "should be" roasted. It's always a preference with how you like or want to express the coffee. Although, I do have some pretty usual starting points with certain origins, altitudes, processes, etc. and then make changes depending on how the specific coffee reacts.

Keep in mind that I only roast the subscription coffees once and I don't have a chance to get fully comfortable with how the coffees are roasted. After the first few batches come out of the roaster I brew them immediately to check how the coffee is responding. Drinking a coffee without letting it rest takes a little getting used to, but is helpful for me to do. I also use the Bunn Trifecta brewer instead of cupping it. I figure it's closer to how you will be brewing it at home.

*Also, I'm roasting on a Probat L12 when I roast for the Ongoing Subscription. I tried roasting dry processed coffees at home on my Hottop and have not had very good luck with them. But, I have only roasted a couple on it.

  

Here are some general notes on how these two coffees were roasted...

Ethiopia Yirga Cheffe Kore Kochore 

  • 22 lbs charge weight.
  • Charge temp between 390° - 410°.
  • 100% air flow all the way through.
  • Turn around time (when temp bottoms out and starts to come back up) around 1:30 minutes.
  • Low temperature 1/3 of full heat for the first 3 minutes.
  • Medium temperature 2/3 of full heat at 3 minutes (cruising up to the yellowing stage!).
  • High temperature - full heat at 6 minutes.
  • Cracking starts at 9.5 minutes.
  • Stay at full heat until coffee is discharged from roaster.
  • Roast time around 11 minutes. City+ roast.

 

The Intent: Keeping it at full heat during first crack until discharging the roast allows the coffee to have a bit of an uneven degree of roast from the outside to the inside of the coffee. This keeps the acidity level nice and balanced with a City+ to full city roast profiles. Also, the sweetness develops like table sugar or simple syrup. Yirga Cheffe's have so much fruitiness and sweetness that this style of roasting works well for my taste. 

 

Ethiopia Gr 1. Dry Process Yirga Cheffee Kochore

  • 22 lbs charge weight.
  • Charge temp between 390° - 410°.
  • 100% air flow all the way through.
  • Turn around time (when temp bottoms out and starts to come back up) around 1:30 minutes.
  • Low temperature 1/3 of full heat for the first 3 minutes.
  • Medium temperature 2/3 of full heat at 3 minutes (again, cruising up to the yellowing stage).
  • Medium / High heat - at 6 minutes.
  • First sign of first crack (almost 11 min), dropped the heat down to low temp, 1/3 of full heat.
  • Stayed at 1/3 until discharge around 12.5 minutes. City+ roast.

 

The Intent: Slowing down the roast at first crack for dry process coffees tames the intensity of the fruit and earthiness. Getting the inside and the outside of the coffee at a more even roast degree brings out a chocolaty and caramel sweetness. You can also tame the acidity with doing this method of roasting if you are looking to do so. This coffee actually carried over a nice acidity level even with slowing it down. Also, if you give dry processed coffees too much heat, they tend to go into second crack a lot faster than washed coffees. Sometimes first crack can roll into second crack without warning. 

 

In conclusion I would like to add that this is one persons opinion on how to approach these coffees. All coffee roasting machines roast differently and react with their own personality. My approach has and will continue to evolve as well as my coffee brewing techniques, coffee preferences and record collection. There are many ways to get from point A to point B, and learning along the way is part of the process for everyone. I would love to hear your feedback about these coffees and or your roasting experiences. :) 

 

-Danny Goot

Ongoing Subscription - Sweet Maria's Bi-Weekly Roasted Coffee Pairing