Latest Posts

  1. Sumatra Video: Aceh in October (Long Edit)

    Sumatra Video: Aceh in October (Long Edit)

    Video visits to coffee farmers and millers around Aceh Sumatra

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  2. Sumatra: Arabica Varieties in Aceh

    Sumatra: Arabica Varieties in Aceh

    This is a list of coffee varieties / cultivars found in Aceh and more broadly in Sumatra, Indonesia

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  3. Sumatra: Stories About Aceh, With Pictures

    Sumatra: Stories About Aceh, With Pictures

    A Sumatra travelogue in photographs, focused on Aceh area around Lake Tawar and Takengon town

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  4. Quick Guide to our Rwanda and Burundi Coffee Sale!

    Quick Guide to our Rwanda and Burundi Coffee Sale!

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  5. Rwanda and Burundi Coffee Quality is Still Undervalued

    Rwanda and Burundi Coffee Quality is Still Undervalued

    These neighboring landlocked East African countries have great coffee, yet how do they rate next to others? Lets see...

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  6. Timor No Leste

    Timor No Leste

    Posted from the road, some thoughts on coffee from East Timor (Timor Leste) and working with small holder farmers.

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  7. Roasting Flores Gunung Gedha on a Popcorn Popper and Quest M3s

    Roasting Flores Gunung Gedha on a Popcorn Popper and Quest M3s

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  8. The Flores Factor

    The Flores Factor

    Crowd pleasing coffee from a promising origin.

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  9. Discussion: Burundi & Global Coffee Market Issues

    Discussion: Burundi & Global Coffee Market Issues

    Sign up for this informative talk about issues surrounding global coffee pricing and small holder farmers.

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  10. Burundi in Photos, May 2019

    Burundi in Photos, May 2019

    A few photos and a cursory introduction to the issues facing Burundi coffee this season

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  11. A Second Look at 4 Ethiopian Coffees

    A Second Look at 4 Ethiopian Coffees

    We took a second look (and taste!) at 4 Ethiopian coffees from our 20% off sale.

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  12. Video: Guatemala 2019 Coffee Clips

    Video: Guatemala 2019 Coffee Clips

    A few fairly low tech clips and some thoughts on coffee processing and coffee buying in Guatemala.

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Rwanda and Burundi Coffee Quality is Still Undervalued

Rwanda and Burundi Coffee Quality is Still Undervalued

Coffees from Burundi and Rwanda, two neighboring East African nations, are real treasures. By now everyone should know a bit about the merits of these coffees: bright, balanced, sweet, and complex at the same time. They offer a fresh option as a new arrival, especially because Not just they come to port in Oakland at a time of year opposite the Central America harvest, when the Costa Rica and Panamas and Mexico coffees are getting a little long in the tooth.

Rwanda and Burundi, with neighboring countries. 1999 Map Rwanda and Burundi, with neighboring countries. 1999 Map

But the fact is, no matter how excited I am about the Burundi and Rwanda offerings we have, that these are the coffees I love to take home for the weekend, they still don’t receive the attention they should. Each harvest, we are always working so hard to sell what we buy. I am not sure why, but I have some ideas.

The first is that people often get “locked on” to a certain perception of coffee from their experience, and sometimes don’t get a chance to revise it. Some people lump all African coffees together into a certain “family of taste.”

Perhaps you tasted a Natural Ethiopia Harar, or a winey Kenya, and believe that other growing regions on the continent would share some of those characteristics. I would dare to say there couldn’t be a bigger mistake to make, nor one that denies your palate a chance to experience the diversity of African coffee origins.

The second issue that explains why some origins sell well and others do not is history – not the history of politics or such, but marketing. When the first roasters started naming the origins where their coffees came from, when they started putting coffee origins on bags (we are talking pre-Starbucks here), some nations were in states of turmoil. The ‘70s were a chaotic time of transition, and a chaotic time for the global economy. Under those conditions, and at a time when “Specialty Coffee” was coming into the consciousness of American consumers, some coffee exporting nations were ready to take advantage, ready to be marketed by US Roasters, while others were in the middle of chaos and upheaval.

Why is Costa Rica coffee so known, so popular? Why is Kenya and Tanzania so established among African coffees? Colombia, etc? It’s because these origins were stable enough to deliver, to market their coffees to roasters, to supply coffee each season. At the same time, why is El Salvador so poorly known, and always trying to play catch up to Costa Rica? And what about Rwanda and Burundi compared to Tanzania and Kenya? Part of the reason seems to be political stability that allowed economic stability.

I have also found people bond with places they have visited, or to an origin where family and friends have gone and brought back coffee… some personal connection. It’s more likely that an American might have visited Costa Rica in the 80s than, say Burundi! The only people I have known from the US in Burundi before the 2000s are missionaries, NGO workers and other politicos.

It would be just an asterisk in coffee if the effects weren’t so real and so harsh. Average specialty coffees from an origin like Kenya sell for far more than Burundi for example, though the quality (while they have completely different cup characteristics) is on par in scoring … great lots are easily 89, 90, 91 points + .

So these old biases, often without intention, but sometimes touching on fears of different cultures and peoples and fears of unknown places, seem to linger a long time, I believe.

Rwanda coffee, as well as Burundi, tends to be old Bourbon type varieties Rwanda coffee, as well as Burundi, tends to be old Bourbon type varieties

Each year I make trips to Rwanda and Burundi, each year I find these coffees on the cupping tables I just love, and each year I overbuy! And I do it because love makes you make stupid mistakes … well, stupid business decisions. And I will keep being stupid this way until everyone else finds out that these coffees are delicious and deserve to be loved and celebrated!

This year I set up a special blind cupping of Rwanda and Burundi stock lots from our warehouse, versus Costa Rica, Guatemalas and Colombias. On a table where every sample was anonymous and ungrouped, I could pick out the complexity of the Rwandas, the sweetness of the Burundis, and sadly the more basic tastes of some of the coffees from the Americas.

One Guatemala, Evelio Villatoro, was super! One Colombia was very nice, complex. But the others languished at the bottom of my scoring range as most of the Rwanda and Burundi towered above them.

I made a short, rough edit video about a blind cupping I did to try to locate the quality and flavor profile of Rwanda and Burundi coffees amongst other wet-processed (aka washed) coffees. These aren't nearby origins, but specifically I wanted to see how the Rwanda and Burundi line up against Latin American coffees in a blind cupping. Below you can see the resulting video from the cupping, and some images of Rwanda and Burundi travels over the last couple years that speak to the experience of travel there...

-Thompson

  1. Rwanda and Burundi Coffee Quality is Still Undervalued

    Tumba Station, Rulindo

    We have been buying from Tumba for several years, and the viw when we approach the station is always so breathtaking. Rwanda is beautiful - Rulindo is beautiful - Tumba district is beautiful!

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  2. Rwanda and Burundi Coffee Quality is Still Undervalued

    Cocatu Cooperative, Rulindo

    The manager Christian and in the jacket the president theodore

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  3. Rwanda and Burundi Coffee Quality is Still Undervalued

    Fermentation bath

    Rinsing out the fermented coffee, Tumba has a very clean water source so even the pulpy water has a clear look. This coffee is headed into the washing channel.

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  4. Rwanda and Burundi Coffee Quality is Still Undervalued

    Gitesi Washing Station

    Ernest and Alex of Gitesi

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  5. Rwanda and Burundi Coffee Quality is Still Undervalued

    Hybrid Bike

    A combination of metal frame Phoenix bike and a wood frame push bike. In many trips here this is the first time I have ever seen something so inventive as this!

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  6. Rwanda and Burundi Coffee Quality is Still Undervalued

    The Nkora Dance

    Nkora is a historic station, said to be the first washing station in country. Before that coffee was home processed, which was usually just pulped and dried, not fermented. Here the laborers use their fet to work the already-fermented mucilage loose from the coffee parchment layer. The dance is a greeting for a visitor. I find it a little embarrassing honestly, but they don't ... so I try to respect that.

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  7. Rwanda and Burundi Coffee Quality is Still Undervalued

    Bugurura Island Trip - The Elder

    We stopped to visit one of the elders on the island in Lake Kivum Bugarura. like others she dries beans from the house eaves. There are 2000 people and 400 farmers on this island producing 300 tons coffee cherry

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  8. Rwanda and Burundi Coffee Quality is Still Undervalued

    Poser with old Coffe

    Old and unpruned Bourbon variety coffee trees on Burgurura island. It felt like stepping back 10 years in time on this island, to when I first came to Rwanda.

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  9. Rwanda and Burundi Coffee Quality is Still Undervalued

    Kids Watching Kids

    The whole family works, and I see this girl has her school outfit on, so this must be her after-school gig (I assume). On Bugarura island.

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  10. Rwanda and Burundi Coffee Quality is Still Undervalued

    Bicycles and Borders

    Burundi is especially pedal-driven, in rural and urban areas, and as we crossed in the later evening the light and bikes had a bit of magic.

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  11. Rwanda and Burundi Coffee Quality is Still Undervalued

    Rubanda Station, Risca

    Kids drinking banana beer

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  12. Rwanda and Burundi Coffee Quality is Still Undervalued

    Not Captured

    Some years ago I started taking photos that essentially forced my camera to fail. In doing so I felt something liberating about the idea of capturing a subject, especially one who didn't choose to be captured. It represented the speed in transience of traveling through an area that you don't really know.

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  13. Rwanda and Burundi Coffee Quality is Still Undervalued

    Loaded Fully

    Largely empty containers I am sure, but in a place where owning a bike is being in the transportation industry, big loads are common. I see people hauling easily 100 kgs of Fanta, Beer, Bananas (probably for making banana beer!)

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  14. Rwanda and Burundi Coffee Quality is Still Undervalued

    Hanging in Style.

    Headed to Ngozi via Kayanza. The hand painted sign styles show such skill, and I dread the day they are replaced with computer inkjet printed banners. Bike culture is everywhere, old and not-so-old Indian-made Phoenix bikes highly stylized.

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  15. Rwanda and Burundi Coffee Quality is Still Undervalued

    Parting Shot

    The taste of the coffee is the best reason to get into roasting Rwanda, but this place, the beauty, the creativity ... do yourself a favor and visit some day. For real.

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  16. Rwanda and Burundi Coffee Quality is Still Undervalued

    Local market near Gaseke

    buying by rwacof staff in local market. turns out this coffee goers to other large rwacof station nearby and not to gaseke

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  17. Rwanda and Burundi Coffee Quality is Still Undervalued

    Rugembe Colline, Phillipe

    We stopped to see some trees of Phillipe and Miriam his wife. He has about 500 trees, making him a sizable farmer. But the amount of cherry on the trees this year is shockingly low, despite a huge effort he makes to fertilize and care for his plants.

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  18. Rwanda and Burundi Coffee Quality is Still Undervalued

    Murambi Colline, near Migoti station

    Walk down from 1800m to farmer plot on the Murambi colline

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