Latest Posts

  1. Bullet R1 Roaster Maintenance: Basic Cleaning

    Bullet R1 Roaster Maintenance: Basic Cleaning

    Tips for keeping your Bullet R1 clean. How often depends on how much you roast per week or month! But a clean roaster is a happy roaster...

    Read More
  2. Podcast Episode #23 - Talking With Jonas About Aillio and The Bullet R1 Roaster

    Podcast Episode #23 - Talking With Jonas About Aillio and The Bullet R1 Roaster

    A conversation with the man behind the machine.

    Read More
  3. The Bullet R1 Meet Up. Video & Highlights

    The Bullet R1 Meet Up. Video & Highlights

    Read More
  4. Bullet R1 Firmware Update Announced

    Bullet R1 Firmware Update Announced

    Bullet roaster owners take note; new firmware!

    Read More
  5. Bullet R1 Roaster Meet Up

    Bullet R1 Roaster Meet Up

    Join us for a meet-up where we will discuss the very popular Aillio Bullet R1 coffee roaster.

    Read More
  6. Video: A Cooler Way to Cool Your Behmor Roast

    Video: A Cooler Way to Cool Your Behmor Roast

    Cool your coffee faster by removing the drum.

    Read More
  7. Aillio Bullet R1 Support

    Aillio Bullet R1 Support

    Need a little help with your Bullet R1? We are here for you.

    Read More
  8. HotTop Roasters Details Page

    HotTop Roasters Details Page

    Read More
  9. Hot Rod Home Coffee Roasters: The Spirit of Invention

    Hot Rod Home Coffee Roasters: The Spirit of Invention

    For some people who roast their own coffee, off-the-shelf home coffee roasting appliances don't cut it.

    Read More
  10. Another Home Roaster Takes the Leap

    Another Home Roaster Takes the Leap

    Sweet Maria's customer jumps into his own coffee business

    Read More
  11. Product Guide: Drum Roasters

    Product Guide: Drum Roasters

    Miniature versions of those commercial roasters you always fantasize about using.

    Read More
  12. Quest Cleaning

    Quest Cleaning

    Photo doc of Dan's Quest M3 cleaning routine.

    Read More

Probat L12 Gas-fired Coffee Roaster

Probat L12 Gas-fired Coffee Roaster

Ever since we moved back to Emeryville, California from Ohio, I dearly missed having a full-size shop roaster. In Ohio we had a Diedrich IR-12, basically a 24 Lb. capacity drum roaster from a really great manufacturer. I have little justification for having a roaster, except that I really like to cup coffees roasted by a variety of methods. I think our dedicated home roasting customers like this too, and I had the thought that some might occassionally want to add a pound of roasted coffee to an order to compare the "degree of roast" and cup results with coffees they roast at home. The only change I wanted to make was to avoid the Infra Red burners -they work quite well but just don't have the BTU output to change a roast mid-way through, or to chose faster roast profiles on full batches. Diedrich makes their excellent chassis with a open-flame burner, but this time I wanted to go with a gas-fired German roaster from Probat. The are real workhorse roasters with a big footprint, more overall bulk. They take more maintenance and cleaning, but really give the roaster-operator a wide range of choices in terms of roast profiling.

How I added logging temperature probes to the Probat L-12:
This is how I have the datalogging 2 probe thermometer set up in the front of the roaster. Then in the rear I have a non-logging single probe in the exit air flow of the drum. It's a setup that gives me exactly the information I need. My only last addition will be a flow-meter (in water column inches) for the gas so I can see exactly where the valve is set, instead of eyeballing the flame.

 

Travels of an L12: Moving the roaster from its old abode in San Francisco to Emeryville, just over the Bay Bridge, was an adventure. We had rented a truck but discovered the roaster was too tall. So we decided to move it in my pickup truck!

That's me (left) taking directions from my friend Troy. There were 4 of us to move it.
A roaster on Van Ness, on our way to the 101
It was a lot easier to get the roast out of the truck than into it... ... I really, really appreciate having a forklift: 3 hours to load, 5 minutes to unload! Here is the L12 sittin on the shop floor as I prepare to install it.
The roaster was in great shape, but dangerously dirty. I found the vent stack was clogged with just a 2" opening!
We are actually going to have the roaster on the 2nd floor mezzanine, a "roasting loft. Here's the space after I rand the gas and electric lines
Here's the same space looking across from the other side of the mezzanine
Here's the space after I layed the aluminum plate down -see the shiny spot from the old Diedrich -a much smaller footprint than the Probat.
Attaching the venting -really high quality Ampco grease duct.
Roasting the first test batches! Actually, I bought several bags of mixed samples to roast up while working out a few probelms, and getting a feel for the burner settings (they are a bit different on each roaster).

This is how I have the datalogging 2 probe thermometer set up in the front of the roaster. Then in the rear I have a non-logging single probe in the exit air flow of the drum. It's a setup that gives me exactly the information I need. My only last addition will be a flow-meter (in water column inches) for the gas so I can see exactly where the valve is set, instead of eyeballing the flame.

 

More to come...