Latest Posts

  1. Intro to Home Roasting Class

    Intro to Home Roasting Class

    Sign up for this roasting basics class. It's going to be a lot of fun.

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  2. Storing Your Roasted Coffee

    Storing Your Roasted Coffee

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  3. Pasquini Espresso Equipment

    Pasquini Espresso Equipment

    We have decided not to continue stocking the Livia, or other Pasquini items. This page remains here as a snapshot of what we thought about the Livia (still, a very nice espresso machine!)

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  4. Proper Pants for Coffee Travels?

    Proper Pants for Coffee Travels?

    Tom's take on on the right pants...more than just protection from ants.

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  5. Coming Soon - The Victorio Stovetop Popper for Coffee Roasting

    Coming Soon - The Victorio Stovetop Popper for Coffee Roasting

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  6. Noah Saves a Hummingbird

    Noah Saves a Hummingbird

    No, it's not a children's book. It's the real life tale of Noah, the hummingbird savior.

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  7. Got Dog Jokes for the 2018 Sweet Maria's Calendar?

    Got Dog Jokes for the 2018 Sweet Maria's Calendar?

    The 2018 Dogs of Coffee Calendar needs your funny dog jokes and riddles.

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  8. Our 20/20/20 Sale! 20% off 20 coffees because we are 20.

    Our 20/20/20 Sale! 20% off 20 coffees because we are 20.

    We are 20 years old, so take 20% off

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  9. Indonesia: A Live Talk with Thompson Owen - CANCELLED

    Indonesia: A Live Talk with Thompson Owen - CANCELLED

    Tom's got a slideshow and some great stories to share about his travels to Indonesia

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  10. Sweet Maria's is Hiring

    Sweet Maria's is Hiring

    We are looking for someone to join our customer service team.

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  11. Send Your Pet Photos to the 2018 Sweet Maria's Calendar Casting Call

    Send Your Pet Photos to the 2018 Sweet Maria's Calendar Casting Call

    Want to have your pet appear in the 2018 Sweet Maria's Calendar?

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  12. Coffee Roasting Demo at Eat Real Festival

    Coffee Roasting Demo at Eat Real Festival

    Learn how to roast your own coffee as you spend your day at Eat Real.

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More Images of the Zassenhaus Clamp-Down Grain Mill

More Images of the Zassenhaus Clamp-Down Grain Mill

 


The mill clamps down and unclamps quickly, easily, and securely. In this image you can see the ABS plastic handle, which made me nervous but, upon inspection, is really designed for heavy use. The crank handle is unfinished beech wood, like the rest of the mill. In fact, this is one heck of a hunk of wood, nearing 7 lbs! You can see the adjustments (grob -fein) which span a huge range so that malt for beer brewing can be effectively crushed, flour can be powdered, and of course, coffee can be ground for any process INCLUDING pump or hand-pull espresso machines --something other hand grinders can't really do. Another bonus, this mill is quiet, compared to the loud crunching sounds of other mills.

This image shows a very off-color balanced (note my hand!) side of the mill, showing a coarse adjustment for beer brewing malty. As a home brewer that uses malt extract and then mashes 1-3 lbs of grain for flavor, this mill suits my needs famously. A customer who does all-grain (12-15 lbs) brewing bought one and found the mill doesn't meet his needs for that kind of volume. The top hopper holds about 1 cup.

Since the mill is made for grain, sometimes large coffee beans don't readily drop into the nylon auger/shaft that drives them into the burrs. Sometimes you have to crank a bit extra if a bean won't drop. This is a non-issue in my opinion, but a friend who bough one mentioned it. Also, fine grinds require more cranking. As with any hand grinder, you must crank for your coffee. Please DON'T buy one (or any hand mill) if you don't want to crank. Buy something with a button to push...

What's with all these pictures of malt??? Well, the coffee photos didn't turn out --to show you the incredibly even and fine grinds requires a very good macro lens that I don't have. Anyway, this is shown to note that the husks of the malt are nicely unground as the malt kernel is broken into particles, a positive feature for the homebrewer I am told. The mill does not include the bowl in the image, but many bowls or jars you have will fit in the space under the burrs.

 


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